Need Help? Support? Or Someone to Talk to?

We want to help! If you reach out we’ll respond quickly and in a professional manner. Let us help you! We understand your issues and work with you instead of putting you down.

Contact Us

We all know that if something happens to us in an accident, or if we have a house fire, we know that by dialing 911, help is on the way.  At the time, we are in dire need of assistance.  The people who come to you are well trained and able to deal with any emergencies you have.  Those who do come to you are also just like you.  Human beings with feelings are sometimes very closely involved with you in your emergency.

What you don’t see is after we go home, the enormity of the situation dawns upon us.  All of us who are EMTs and firefighters do not do this as a job.  It is a way of giving back to our communities and to use our training to support our fellow human beings on this planet.  What you don’t see is the aftermath.  We also have families, and we have deep feelings.  After an incident, we go home, and sometimes we fall apart in the privacy of our own home and family.  Too many times after a severe incident, whether it’s loss of life or severe injury, we handle everything as it is to the best of our ability.  Unless you are closely associated with an EMT or firefighter, it is after we come home that we sometimes lose it.  That is where the support of family and friends comes to our own rescue.  It is important that EMTs and firefighters have a support base.  If you don’t, I would suggest a counselor.  The feelings that you have during the incident tend to be bottled up, but sometimes we need help in dealing with what we have just seen and gone through.

For instance, our department received a call of an overturned pickup truck.  When we got there, four children between the ages of 2 and 7 were riding in the bed of an open pickup truck.  The driver was their father.  He was drunk.  He was going too fast and swerved to avoid another vehicle in the roadway and in turn flipped his truck over.  The youngest child, a 2-year-old girl, was flung up into a tree by the side of the road.  I climbed that tree and got her safely in my arms, but she was so badly injured.  She took her last breath in my arms.  Out of the three remaining children, two were dead after being thrown, and the fourth remains a quadriplegic to this day.  When I saw the devastation and the dead children, I completely lost control.  The driver was fine, and I went ballistic.  I grabbed the driver by the throat and yelled at him, ‘How can you do this.’  It took three big firefighters to get me off of him.

For instance, our department received a call of an overturned pickup truck.  When we got there, four children between the ages of 2 and 7 were riding in the bed of an open pickup truck.  The driver was their father.  He was drunk.  He was going too fast and swerved to avoid another vehicle in the roadway and in turn flipped his truck over.  The youngest child, a 2-year-old girl, was flung up into a tree by the side of the road.  I climbed that tree and got her safely in my arms, but she was so badly injured.  She took her last breath in my arms.  Out of the three remaining children, two were dead after being thrown, and the fourth remains a quadriplegic to this day.  When I saw the devastation and the dead children, I completely lost control.  The driver was fine, and I went ballistic.  I grabbed the driver by the throat and yelled at him, ‘How can you do this.’  It took three big firefighters to get me off of him.

I was summarily suspended for all duties as a firefighter and EMT for 30 days, but my fire chief, when he suspended me, ordered in counseling for me.  I went to the counselor and cried.  I let it all out on her.  I was angry and frustrated.  The counselor helped me to get it all out, to cry, to scream, and to let my feelings out to where it did not become bottled up.  After 30 days of seeing the counselor, I realized that at times, we ourselves need help.  I was able to go back after my suspension and deal with things with a clearer head.  I’ve never repeated the same mistake.  However, it is so important to get counseling when a situation like this results in an unfortunate reaction.  I came to terms with this through counseling and help.  I would suggest that all firefighters and EMTs seek help at one point or another.  We can’t keep things bottled up because we will explode.

To all the firefighters and EMTs out there, thank you for what you do.  Our job is so important to rescue people in tough times.  It is never an easy job; however, take advantage of any help and resources you may have at hand.  From my friend, Pookie